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Best free password manager app

#1
So today, I wanted to bring to be discussed on the forum Passwords Manager apps. I tried to search here on the forum, but didn't found this topic open yet and I think this can be great so people that use any of these tools could share their experience and recommendations. Are you a fan of password manager apps or browser extensions? or do you still have everything written down on a paper or notepad?

Memorizing a lot of passwords for the many emails, services, accounts, banks, and others can be a hard task nowadays. I am curious to know how everyone tackles this and try to find out if there is a better way.

Also recently I saw in tech news that 'LastPass' a well-known password manager app, was hacked. Leaking passwords and information of there users. ( I am not sure if this is already fixed, but a word of caution on the use of certain apps like this)

If I may recommend from my recent researches, I would say to use and try 'Bitwarden'. It's free and open source and works on all browsers, mobile phones, and operating systems. The reviews online seem to be great and anyone that used had only great things to say about it. In the opposite spectrum, I would stay away from apps like LastPass, Dashlane, and others that are private with closed source. They usually are more vulnerable.

But let me know your thoughts about it. I would love to know what is the safest and ultimate free password manager app in your opinion.
#2
I've got a mixture of using Excel spreadsheet and NotePad notes all over the show. Mostly I try to remember as I think it's probably good to exercise the brain cells a bit. I have a great lack of trust in any automatic password system. I don't think I want to use them. My passwords have backups of backups and are subtle. Far from perfect system, but it works for me.
#3
(02-15-2019, 08:38 PM)Genesis Wrote: I've got a mixture of using Excel spreadsheet and NotePad notes all over the show. Mostly I try to remember as I think it's probably good to exercise the brain cells a bit. I have a great lack of trust in any automatic password system. I don't think I want to use them. My passwords have backups of backups and are subtle. Far from perfect system, but it works for me.

I also have them on the old school model as well and spread in different places. The problem is that sometimes, I catch myself missing the first attempts or not being able to remember. It happen in just a few times, but so many codes that become hard to know them all. Do you check often as well if your accounts or password are compromises in 'have i been pwned?' . Recently there were massive leaks, gigabytes of data in passwords and emails they added there as well to review if peoples accounts or passwords are a compromise. When it's time to change a password you just create a new one and update the excel and notepad?

Why don't you trust on password manager apps, you think that info could also be hacked independently of the company that provides that service?
#4
(02-15-2019, 09:11 PM)Kreesher Wrote: I also have them on the old school model as well and spread in different places. The problem is that sometimes, I catch myself missing the first attempts or not being able to remember. It happen in just a few times, but so many codes that become hard to know them all.
That is very true in my case too. Like two weeks ago the website account asked more than what I normally put in a password. I had forgotten about it, so when I tried to access the account with the logical version of my password, it didn't work. I had to ask for a password reset. And that's frustrating of course but at least I now won't forget.

(02-15-2019, 09:11 PM)Kreesher Wrote: Do you check often as well if your accounts or password are compromises in 'have i been pwned?' . Recently there were massive leaks, gigabytes of data in passwords and emails they added there as well to review if peoples accounts or passwords are a compromise. When it's time to change a password you just create a new one and update the excel and notepad?

Why don't you trust on password manager apps, you think that info could also be hacked independently of the company that provides that service?
Yes I do check, and if a leak is even mentioned - like it did at Yahoo a couple or more years ago, I change all of my passwords at Yahoo. I'm particularly vigilant of the passwords of my PayPal, and business e-mail - e-mail accounts like those. PayPal has its own inbuilt security due to its regional restriction that I have to use a VPN to access outside my region. Namecheap is even more clever in that it forces one to change one's password every 6 months or it puts you through a catpcha. I hate captchas. But yes, I think I'm vigilant with my passwords. My WordPress admin panel passwords are kept in notepads in different places. They are all very random 18-20 digit passwords.

It's obviously not a perfect system though. If someone can show me something better that I can trust, then I'd probably try it. So I'm interested in the comments that will be made to this thread.
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#5
I would personally go with Bitwarden. It's open-source, cross-platform and has extensions available for every platform. Also, unlike KeePass, it's a bit more user-friendly.

https://bitwarden.com/
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#6
Keepass has been used to protect local copies of passwords.

If you do choose to pay for one, LastPass has a good reputation.
#7
My favourite password management is Google Chrome.

It now generates you passwords, saves them for automatic login and so you can look and remember it. So making new accounts is very swift and quick I no longer have to generate the password google does it all for me.

Along with secondary authentication, people who try to get my account, I would have to get authorisation with my phone. Even if I log onto a public computer the passwords will not be available as that also has to be authorised with synchronisation to the computer.

Google has become a great hub for keeping everything secure and accessible with syncing and backing up. Depends if you trust Google to keep your data.

The passwords generated are long random characters which I prefer to use nowadays as password cracking has gotten a lot easier, especially with new powerful hardware GPUs.

Barnum Designs
#8
Probably an answer you won’t choose would be a paper in your wallet.
It can’t be hacked. It can’t be sniffed over the network. It is subject to water threats and you might lose it.

Don’t write too small or as you grow older, it will become obfusticated. Lol
#9
(03-10-2019, 07:08 PM)Barnum4000 Wrote: Google has become a great hub for keeping everything secure and accessible with syncing and backing up. Depends if you trust Google to keep your data.

That is the main issue there... The trust each people have on the companies and their services. I always try to stay away from google services but is really complicated nowadays. I still use some of the apps like youtube, but if there were better alternatives. I would be the first to jump out of Google 'train' in a snap. I don't trust it has my browser search, even less to be my password manager service. 

Regarding Google Chrome I just test it for a while a long time ago and after having my ram usage drop to unbearable levels that resulted in experiencing lag on my machine. I changed my browser to another and never look back. Chrome optimization, in my opinion, has a lot to improve.
#10
(03-10-2019, 11:10 PM)Drcool Wrote: Don’t write too small or as you grow older, it will become obfusticated. Lol

Ahah... and by the time we get old, the paper will be so long you will need a backpack, instead of the wallet. I think services like Evernote or others that is a simple text app can help since it synchronizes across devices. With that feature, you have the piece of mind that if you lose your phone you have everything on your laptop/pc or vice versa.

The paper if you lose it, you lose all of the passwords for good, no backup there. Unless you have a great memory after getting old, like that guy on the Guinness book that is the 'human calculator' that guy will not have that kind of issues...lol
#11
Lol, true!!

So long as Evernote’s security is strong.
#12
I too do not trust any automated password manager. You really want to consider the two types of security, digital and physical.
I use a physical password notepad but all the passwords have a single character encrypted and the key is in my head.
What you want to avoid is using "secure access delegation" like where to use your Facebook or Gmail account details instead of creating a new account for a website.
The old adage "Don't put all your eggs in the one basket" you want to limit the impact if you do get hacked.
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#13
(03-11-2019, 01:30 PM)Drcool Wrote: So long as Evernote’s security is strong.
I said evernote but you can use a lot of text apps or software that share txt files. If it's encrypted and you can keep changing passwords that would help too.

I think with cryptocurrencies, cyber wallets and so many cyber attacks each second in so many services we have nowadays the passwords have to become much harder and complicated to prevent brute force attacks. That will lead to those passwords becoming so difficult to memorize and even harder to write all down on a paper that there will become a time password manager will be the norm and standard. It can be another kind of software of those we have today, but really long passwords and encrypted will be sooner or later be the standard and they are already here to stay. I like a quote that I read and find really accurate on this subject
' The Only Secure Password Is the One You Can't Remember' 
#14
(03-13-2019, 01:09 AM)buzzawak Wrote: What you want to avoid is using "secure access delegation" like where to use your Facebook or Gmail account details instead of creating a new account for a website.

But for example on the current browser you are using to access the internet do you usually press the button 'don't remember my password' and type every single time you go to that service or website ? or you press 'remember my password' so in the next time it auto-fills having access to your credentials saved on the browser? 

Because if you save it like that ... chrome, firefox, and other browsers sync all that information. So from that point of view, there are more than just facebook and gmail access delegation to be a concern here.
#15
(02-24-2019, 07:46 PM)jelle619 Wrote: I would personally go with Bitwarden. It's open-source, cross-platform and has extensions available for every platform. Also, unlike KeePass, it's a bit more user-friendly.

https://bitwarden.com/

I totally agree, bitwarden is very good and user-friendly.

In the past i have used lastpass, but for a long time had issues with browser(ff) freezing without proper solution and when they got acquired by logmein i was done and started using bitwarden.
#16
I've used keepass which is ok. The problem arises when there are more users. Even though keepass has some sync, it really does not work. What I suggest is to use SQLite to store your login/password info but also use some encryption on the password so you can have it secure. You may use Tiny Encription Algorithim or Blowfish or some other you like to scramble the plain text password using your own predefined key.
  




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