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Dying languages?

#1
Is there any programming languages you think that are on the decline and becoming less popular?

I was thinking Ruby on Rails but large websites like Github use it. Are there any languages going extinct or will programming languages always have a place in software and web development?

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#2
If strictly related to web, I would have to say none. The stuff around; which consists of ASP.NET, Node.JS, Ruby on Rails and PHP are all still pretty much alive.

If you're not looking at web however, I would have to go with the stuff below.
C and C++.
#3
In my opinion Pascal is dying.
#4
(11-05-2017, 08:48 AM)KillOrDi3 Wrote: In my opinion Pascal is dying.

What makes you think that? What have you read, seen or heard that gives the impression that it is dying?

Posts like the one above do not count as Quality Posts and won't bring you any closer to earning hosting or a VPS.
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#5
A programming language that is slated for death (according to 'intellectuals' who meet the definition by Author C. Clarke) is COBOL.  Yet it is still going strong.  It's still used in back-end systems. https://blog.codinghorror.com/cobol-ever...d-nowhere/
#6
I think domain-specific languages are the ones at most risk of dying. For example, if Flash dies then ActionScript will most likely die too.
#7
Last time I used Pascal, was the begining of 00's. I suppose today it could be used for educational purposes, but I wonder if Pascal could make a great soft perspectively.
#8
(11-10-2017, 04:07 PM)Peter Wrote: I think domain-specific languages are the ones at most risk of dying. For example, if Flash dies then ActionScript will most likely die too.

Disagree, I found the DSL in growing popularity today. Not for soft crafting, but for use in such areas like legal, medicine, finance, HR.
#9
(11-11-2017, 06:48 AM)vicious Wrote:
(11-10-2017, 04:07 PM)Peter Wrote: I think domain-specific languages are the ones at most risk of dying. For example, if Flash dies then ActionScript will most likely die too.

Not for soft crafting, but for use in such areas like legal, medicine, finance, HR.
Oh wow! I wonder what the legal, medicine and finance would have to say about your statement where precision is so important to them. For large corporations I have an understanding for it, as they even work in different time zones and regions and their languages and content of the different regions are region specific including language. But for smaller companies and your small entrepreneur, I'd think it would be very expensive and difficult for them to revert to different languages that easily. They'd probably go for the language they do business in only. Until they can afford and have the manpower to deal in business in a different language.

#10
The same story of CRM soft. Ten years ago large corporations had its own sophisticated CRM solutions, while small business couldn't afford any. However, now I see tools as salesforce, which created some standards in CRM processes and approaches. The same perspective with domain specific languages. While large corporations create its own DSLs for Legal or HR, may be some DSL developers already creating standards for Legal or HR DSL suitable for small business.
However, no doubt a lot of DSLs are doomed, but not DSL as languages class or type
#11
vicious Wrote:
Peter Wrote:I think domain-specific languages are the ones at most risk of dying. For example, if Flash dies then ActionScript will most likely die too.

Disagree, I found the DSL in growing popularity today. Not for soft crafting, but for use in such areas like legal, medicine, finance, HR.  

I didn't mean domain-specific languages as a whole. I meant individual domain-specific languages are at risk if the domain that they are targeting lose interest. General purpose languages such as C++, Python, Haskell and Java are not as vulnerable because they are used to create many different types of software.
#12
(11-11-2017, 02:13 PM)Peter Wrote:
vicious Wrote:
Peter Wrote:I think domain-specific languages are the ones at most risk of dying. For example, if Flash dies then ActionScript will most likely die too.

Disagree, I found the DSL in growing popularity today. Not for soft crafting, but for use in such areas like legal, medicine, finance, HR.   

I didn't mean domain-specific languages as a whole. I meant individual domain-specific languages are at risk if the domain that they are targeting lose interest.
And that is the point I cannot disagree with. As I already mentioned above, a lot of DSLs are doomed, many that are one-task-long, etc.
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#13
(11-11-2017, 06:44 AM)vicious Wrote: Last time I used Pascal, was the begining of 00's. I suppose today it could be used for educational purposes, but I wonder if Pascal could make a great soft perspectively.
Free Pascal (based on Borland Pascal) and Lazarus (freeware Delphi) seems to be alive and well, recent versions released.  Their site is https://www.freepascal.org/

Done some playing around w/ both, have tutorials at http://rrroberts.50webs.com/cobindex.htm.  Please note - these are rudimentary tutorials, I used to be HP3000 COBOL/FORTRAN programmer.  I'm sure my sample programs can be improved, tutorials were written as I was learning (or re-learning) the various languages.
#14
I would like to comment on the supposition of your question.  You ask are there any languages that are becoming less popular and state you were looking at learning X but didn't because of Y.  All tech has it's place in its time.  I'm not sure if there is any programming language that was invented that is now "dead."  All languages have their place even if just for teaching purposes.  Latin is a dead language but it is still taught in schools all over the world because it is the root of many other languages.  Even though, for example, COBOL may not be taught in school any more I'm sure it still has relevant present day applications.  If you are learning, I would not let any reason/argument prevent you from pursuing a specific language.  Even if you never write a program in language X you learn so many residual lessons in the process.

As to the specific question of what languages will become less popular, I think that Java has the highest potential to lose popularity.  I took a class in college a few years ago and at that time Java had a 85% market share.   When you are on top there is only one way to go.....DOWN.  We never know what tomorrow holds.  BlockBuster didn't anticipate NetFlix.  Home Phone companies didn't anticipate smart phones, etc., etc..
#15
maybe some languages are declining in popularity, but I don't think any have died yet.
#16
Some might laugh, but i believe VB has started to decline.   Considering C# and other languages with "bracketed" sytnax, variable scopes defined in a much more specific way, and the general idea of a language where Less is more.  To me VB (visual basic) while there is still a huge code bank out there, will continue to decline much like COBOL continues to. Sure VB will be around for years to come and obviously if it all compiles down to the same (ish) object code someone might say "who cares" (as far as MS languages).  Still i believe it to be beginning to decline.
#17
Dear all,

In my opinion most of the languages are on the backend that's why they are hidden, we can't say that they are dead.
#18
(09-11-2017, 06:27 PM)Barnum4000 Wrote: Is there any programming languages you think that are on the decline and becoming less popular?

I was thinking Ruby on Rails but large websites like Github use it. Are there any languages going extinct or will programming languages always have a place in software and web development?

Ruby on Rails (or RoR for the initiated) is a Web application framework (PHP has many of these too.) But the Language is Ruby, and ruby is everything but in decline! See TIOBE's Index

Programming languages come and go, and for as long as there at least one use case for them where they excel, then they will stick around for just that.
IN ABSENTIA LUCIS, TENEBRAE VINCUNT
IN THE ABSENCE OF LIGHT, DARKNESS PREVAILS
#19
COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) was the second language after basic I learned. You young-ins may never get to experience writing code for a mainframe. Back then you would hand write your code on coding sheets making sure  each letter was neatly in the grid box. This would be given to the input operator based on allocated computing time. You would after a few days get a printout of your code including errors and the results of the program. Never got to see the actual mainframe. lol the good old days !
#20
I am a Perl programmer and I can say that younger folks are turning into something more readable as Python or Javascript. There is a horrifing (IMHO) Perl 6 that is nothing like its older awkard Perl 5 sibling. Perl 6 is dying, in fact, it is unborn.
  




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