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Any Virtualbox users here?

#1
Any Virtualbox users here? I created my first virtualbox on a "cheap" new laptop of mine as a precusor fo working with Linux over the holidays. It was almost too easy to install. For every question I had so far all I had to do was fire up a question in Google, and then realized there are a large number of Virtualbox users out there.

This tutorial was specifically very useful in setting Virtualbox up:
http://teaching.idallen.com/cst8207/14f/...stall.html

This tutorial provided plenty of insights, particularly after my first attempt at loading CentOS 7.0 to my Virtualbox failed:



The Virtualbox is teaching me a little more about the new laptop I have. For example, when I was trying to download a CentOS 7.0 ISO image, it wouldn't allow me to do it. The "cheap" laptop is 64-bit, but then discovered that one has to get stuck into the Bios to enable the 64-bit capability. That added a new challenge as to how to get into the Lenovo BIOS as the way it has been set up to boot up fast, means that one can't log out properly enough for F1 or F12 to work. Then after firing off some new questions in my Google search box, discovered my Lenovo G50 Laptop has a little secret button that works with a pencil tip. One has to poke it while the laptop is turned off, and it will then get the BIOS up. Neat! Then finally was able to enable the 64-bit and that worked. Next stage tomorrow is to hopefully finally be able to install CentOS 7.0 image.

Anyone else using Virtualbox, and what have your experiences been like? I'm thinking of creating more partitions, like I can definitely visualize at least one for Windows XP. The bigger one for Linux.
#2
I have tried to use VirtualBox before. I didn't like it much. I used VMware to do the samething. I found it was easier to install Linux images.

Either one of them is great to install a second O/S like linux. It gives you a chance to play around and learn without having to partition your hard drive. A lot of devs use them to test with and to download files. This way, if there is a trojan or virus contained in them, it doesn't infect the whole drive. Some call this a sandbox. They can run the program without loosing data. One of the sites I am on, has a couple of images for Vbox and VMware that are loading with some testing tools.
#3
(11-29-2015, 09:05 PM)strokerace Wrote: I have tried to use VirtualBox before. I didn't like it much. I used VMware to do the samething. I found it was easier to install Linux images.

Either one of them is great to install a second O/S like linux. It gives you a chance to play around and learn without having to partition your hard drive. A lot of devs use them to test with and to download files. This way, if there is a trojan or virus contained in them, it doesn't infect the whole drive. Some call this a sandbox. They can run the program without loosing data. One of the sites I am on, has a couple of images for Vbox and VMware that are loading with some testing tools.
Thanks. I haven't investigated VMware. Think I got as far as it comes with 8.1 Professional only.

But yes, that's the objective. I'd like to install a second O/S Linux. I finally managed to download the full version of Centos 7.0. So will start playing with it tomorrow.
#4
I have used it for testing if programs that I have written work with different versions of Linux and on Windows. I have also used it for installing different versions of web browsers so that I can test my website in many different versions of the same browser, and because I use Linux this is how I have to do in order to test Internet Explorer.

VirtualBox has a useful feature that allow you to take snapshots that you can restore later. This can be very useful sometimes. You don't have to worry too much about making mistakes.
#5
(11-30-2015, 08:43 AM)Peter Wrote: VirtualBox has a useful feature that allow you to take snapshots that you can restore later. This can be very useful sometimes. You don't have to worry too much about making mistakes.
I've avoided using Virtual Box for many years because of worrying about making mistakes as well as security issues. If I had known how easy it is and all of the side benefits to having it, I'd have used it a long time ago. I picked up a very cheap laptop - Lenovo GA50 i7 and bought it specifically for using it for experimental development work I wouldn't have wanted to use my more expensive desktop computer for. Almost like an anti-climax to discover how effortless it really is and obviously thousands of developers must be using it if one checks out all the documentation and tutorials that are available.
#6
Well virtualbox is good for testing or simulating server but if you want more configuration you can use VMware instead.
Been using virtual box for simulating simple server setup.

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#7
(11-30-2015, 09:45 PM)agentsky Wrote: Well virtualbox is good for testing or simulating server but if you want more configuration you can use VMware instead.
Been using virtual box for simulating simple server setup.

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I did some research on VMware. Apparently it comes with Windows 8.1 Professional and all one needs to do is enable it. I'm considering getting Windows 8.1 Professional. For now I've got the basic version on my cheap laptop.
#8
Virtual Box is good application to run VMs but I found VMware better at emulating VMs. They run better on VMware because of better compatibility
#9
I use Virtualbox quite a bit for testing and demo's. It pretty easy to use and it does have a large user community in case you need support. I usually test new Linux distro's on it when i find one Cool

I really like the command line options as well, give you a lot of flexiblity to edit/change settings of your VM. Especially if you have some compatility issue. But will take some time to figure out though..

It's also true that VMWare is a bit more stable when it comes to run VM's.
#10
I actually do use VirtualBox. Well I don't use it constantly but since I use Ubuntu Ultimate as my main OS, sometimes it's easier to use VB with an XP partition and run PalTalk, Sim games and a few other old-school programs rather than reboot into my Win7 partition.
#11
I use both VirtualBox and VMware, but mostly the second one. I'm Using VMware since a long time and have tried almost every operating system in it.
But why you want to buy Windows 8.1 when Windows 10 is out ?
#12
I like VirtualBox a lot, Since it lets me use all kind of OS I want beside my Windows. But since it eats RAM I am I bit low on RAM, so I can't give it over 512mb Rolleyes But why isn't the Drag'n'Drop working ( I have Guest Additions )
#13
I use virtualbox as local server for web developing. just install ubuntu server and lamp
#14
(02-08-2016, 05:45 AM)zihadeasin Wrote: I like VirtualBox a lot, Since it lets me use all kind of OS I want beside my Windows. But since it eats RAM I am I bit low on RAM, so I can't give it over 512mb Rolleyes But why isn't the Drag'n'Drop working ( I have Guest Additions )

With 512MB of RAM you are in fact slowing things down (a lot of paging) if you're adding GUIs, which apparently you do since you're asking about the Drag'n'Drop.

Drag'n'Drop between the host/guest is possible if you enable it.
IN ABSENTIA LUCIS, TENEBRAE VINCUNT
IN THE ABSENCE OF LIGHT, DARKNESS PREVAILS
#15
I find that VirtualBox is a lot slower than VMware. But VirtualBox is free and VMware is too expensive. But VirtualBox supports more OS'es. But VMware is more integrated. They both take up a lot of space and have many pros and cons. There's also Parallels, which I haven't tried but is supposed to be good.
#16
(03-04-2016, 10:42 PM)Coder-256 Wrote: I find that VirtualBox is a lot slower than VMware. But VirtualBox is free and VMware is too expensive. But VirtualBox supports more OS'es. But VMware is more integrated. They both take up a lot of space and have many pros and cons. There's also Parallels, which I haven't tried but is supposed to be good.

If I have to chose between the two, I would certainly chose VMware. VMware, as far as I know, is the pioneer in the hardware virtualization arena, so it's no wonder why VMware Tech. is the better one.

I still remember my bewilderment when I first made my first VM machine with VMware Tech a decade+ ago.

VirtualBox is generally fine especially since its 4.x.x iterations although not always reliable especially on certain hardware config. It's widespread use is certainly due to it being free and many automation tools rely on it....

Side Note:
Just remember that nowadays there is M$$'s own hypervisor (Hyper-V) in Windows 8.1/Windows10. On the server-side, it's available since Windows Server 2008 R2-64bits.
IN ABSENTIA LUCIS, TENEBRAE VINCUNT
IN THE ABSENCE OF LIGHT, DARKNESS PREVAILS
#17
I do not use VirtuaBox because I don't really need it and I would prefer to have a separate HDD with an OS installed on it than just running it through a piece of software. But I may use it to test an Operating system out before I actually install it on a HDD. I am planning to install a Linux OS on my computer that currently has Windows 10 installed on it so maybe I will try it out VirtualBox then.

Barnum Designs
#18
I usually use VMware but considering the hype arounf Virtual Box I am wondering about switching. What'd you suggest, I mean is VMware really that bad?
#19
(03-08-2016, 01:11 AM)tornado Wrote: I usually use VMware but considering the hype arounf Virtual Box I am wondering about switching. What'd you suggest, I mean is VMware really that bad?

The two pieces of software are similar I've never personally used any virtualisation software before only at a business which set it up all for me. I would only suggest changing if there will be significant improvement to the one you are currently using. If VMware is currently working fine for you then it may not be worth changing but because I have not used it a lot I am not too knowledgeable with the software I tend to just install the OS and keep it.

Barnum Designs
#20
I use VBox to create testing envinronment for development.
#21
I do use VM sometimes. It's useful if you don't have another pc to test the things on for example the last thing i test is if nodejs work just with the .exe file, and the answer is yes :)
#22
(11-29-2015, 06:58 PM)Genesis Wrote: Any Virtualbox users here? I created my first virtualbox on a "cheap" new laptop of mine as a precusor fo working with Linux over the holidays. It was almost too easy to install. For every question I had so far all I had to do was fire up a question in Google, and then realized there are a large number of Virtualbox users out there.

This tutorial was specifically very useful in setting Virtualbox up:
http://teaching.idallen.com/cst8207/14f/...stall.html

This tutorial provided plenty of insights, particularly after my first attempt at loading CentOS 7.0 to my Virtualbox failed:



The Virtualbox is teaching me a little more about the new laptop I have. For example, when I was trying to download a CentOS 7.0 ISO image, it wouldn't allow me to do it. The "cheap" laptop is 64-bit, but then discovered that one has to get stuck into the Bios to enable the 64-bit capability. That added a new challenge as to how to get into the Lenovo BIOS as the way it has been set up to boot up fast, means that one can't log out properly enough for F1 or F12 to work. Then after firing off some new questions in my Google search box, discovered my Lenovo G50 Laptop has a little secret button that works with a pencil tip. One has to poke it while the laptop is turned off, and it will then get the BIOS up. Neat! Then finally was able to enable the 64-bit and that worked. Next stage tomorrow is to hopefully finally be able to install CentOS 7.0 image.

Anyone else using Virtualbox, and what have your experiences been like? I'm thinking of creating more partitions, like I can definitely visualize at least one for Windows XP. The bigger one for Linux.

I would also go into your bios and make sure that Virtualization is turned on. You would be amazed how more smoother things run!

I also have a Hyper-V Core as well as an ESXI server running for testing vms out. They all work great and cost me $0 other than the hardware.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't...
#23
Hello. I use VirtualBox in a daily basis. I read once in a book called "The productive programmer" or something like that, that is an advantage to have a Virtual Machine for every different development environment. For example if you work with PHP, Mysql and Apache you must have one VM with only that installed. If you work with Java, Postgres and Tomcat another for that environment and so on. That allows you no to have your machine's OS loaded with so many different programs. You have to use more storage space but you gain in organization and is easier to have more storage space than to have more CPU.

I hope this is useful.
#24
(04-21-2016, 03:45 PM)yuninho2005 Wrote: Hello. I use VirtualBox in a daily basis. I read once in a book called "The productive programmer" or something like that, that is an advantage to have a Virtual Machine for every different development environment. For example if you work with PHP, Mysql and Apache you must have one VM with only that installed. If you work with Java, Postgres and Tomcat another for that environment and so on. That allows you no to have your machine's OS loaded with so many different programs. You have to use more storage space but you gain in organization and is easier to have more storage space than to have more CPU.

I hope this is useful.

I see exactly where you are going with this. Another thing to point out is that some packages may include overhead from another package. Having the VM separated like @yuninho2005 mentioned, would get rid of this.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't...
#25
Is worth to mention that one can copy the VM hard drive to a USB and use it in different places. The only requirement is to have VBox installed. We have to be careful with the drivers in the case of Windows or if there is a significant difference with the architecture of the computers.
#26
I very like VirtualBox it's just good piece of software but I preffered VMWare Workstation or Player. If you learn Puppet or Vagrant.... you can automate A LOT of repetitive activities/task like a Installing Operating Systems apps in ready VM etc.

I think virtualbox have one con for me: Don't have built-in web interface or something to controll and manage VM from other location... Ok methods leading to this exist but still it's not simple like ex. VMWare Workstation:
Copy and insert to shared and from other computer Connect to the Remote Server and it's work.

But I think Virtualbox is the best option to discover the magic world of virtualization... Of course in my opinion :)
#27
I use Virtualbox when i want to play some android games on the PC. I use ISO of the 64bit version of the Android-x86 project. It's port of android to x86 cpu's. It works very smooth even on lower spec PC.
Games run better and faster that on Android Emulators.
#28
That's funny now I'm on Lenovo laptop too, and I did spent some time to find 1) about this button and then 2) where this button is (answer: sometimes, on the left side, sometimes, near the power button). Some time ago when I tested Virtualbox I had some problems too, mostly with missing kernel KVM module for the virtualization to work (solution: install it & relogin / reboot).
#29
Totally recommend VMware over virtualbox, another awesome thing to test/play around with is esxi - linux based VM manager with web interface.

Need further assistance give me a shot
#30
I like Virtualbox because it has a "headless" mode. It also hasa command line interface wich can be automated. It also saves snapshots very fast.

What I dont like about it is how easy is to destroy a VM by tampering in its XML.
  




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