Best Linux alternative to Centos for Apache?

Genesis

Administrator
Staff member
Last Christmas I tried out CentOS since it seemed to be the Linux distribution that works the best with Apache. I like Apache. I thought it may be an idea this Christmas to experiment with a different Linux distribution. In your own experience which Linux distribution works the same or better with Apache than CentOS does?
 

GigaGreg

Moderator
Staff member
I think that Debian just works good with Apache and all that stuff. It seems to be working well for me as when I used it, I didn't had any problems with it.

Debian is definitely good for servers. I am using Debian for nearly a year and I cannot say anything bad against it.
 

Genesis

Administrator
Staff member
I can't say anything bad about CentOS either. I'm thinking of getting hands on experience with alternative distributions.
 

aandreyy96

New member
I use Ubuntu because i'm familliar with the apt-get commands.
In my experience both ubuntu and centos are working well with apache.
 

robonxt

New member
I have been using Ubuntu ever since I started to use computer (first OS was Windows XP....Ahh, the good 'ol days) and personally I love it, that is before Ubuntu 15.04 (haven't upgraded to it yet, love 14.04)
 

xdude

New member
Since last month I have started learning and using Ubuntu. I guess it was mostly because I have started using virtualmin. I thought it's better since Ubuntu have nice desktop version too. They do have nice user base which is friendly and willing to help.

First I tried Centos 6.7 + Virtualmin. Problem was Centos 6.7 has mysql 5 and if you try to upgrade it mess up virtualmin (in my experience, Im sure there are other Centos/vritualmin experts who can do this) But with Ubuntu 14 you get mysql5.5 and latest PHP.
 

digiwolf

New member
that depends if you wanna use low resourses you should use turnkey linus lamp edition, is nice and it comes prebuild with apache, mysql and everything else related to those servers, and works pretty smooth
 
It all depends on what you are doing with the O/S. Majority of all Linux distro's run Apache fairly well. RHEL, Centos and Debian are all designed for servers. So, they are well supported for Apache.

Here is something taking from wiki
"In July 2010, CentOS overtook Debian to become the most popular Linux distribution for web servers, with almost 30% of all Linux web servers using it.[14] (Debian retook the lead in January 2012.[15])

In January 2014, Red Hat announced that it would sponsor the CentOS project, "helping to establish a platform well-suited to the needs of open source developers that integrate technologies in and around the operating system".[16] As the result of these changes, ownership of CentOS trademarks was transferred to Red Hat,[17] which now employs most of the CentOS head developers; however, they work as part of the Red Hat's Open Source and Standards team, which operates separately from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux team.[7] A new CentOS governing board was also established.[8]"
 

agentsky

New member
For servers use Red Hat, Debian or Suse derivatives. Well ubuntu is good for beginners but if you want to learn to use linux then you should avoid linux that are built as desktop.
Why because linux server are not using GUI for configuration instead most of them are using the CLI for configuration.

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Genesis

Administrator
Staff member
agentsky said:
For servers use Red Hat, Debian or Suse derivatives. Well ubuntu is good for beginners but if you want to learn to use linux then you should avoid linux that are built as desktop.
Why because linux server are not using GUI for configuration instead most of them are using the CLI for configuration.

Sent from my SM-N9005 using Tapatalk
Thanks for the tip. You're right of course for good factual reasons. One needs to go to the basics of Linux instead of looking for a Windows look alike distribution.
 

MikeGao

New member
I really like h2o and litespeed, both of them are lightweight, both of them are very nicely coded.
Nginx also is quite lightweight, for bigger sites I suggest to use tengine (modified nginx)
 

kentwiggins

New member
Have you tried Arch Linux? I use the ARM version on a Raspberry PI now, and it works really well.
It was recommended to me by a friend (web dev) to learn linux the "right way".
It's pretty much alike CentOS, with some differences. You should also check the basic corespondents here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman/Rosetta

And another thing... Why would you not try Nginx? I saw many big websites that are using Nginx now.
 

bluenazgul

New member
MY favorit is Ubuntu, but thats only my choise - the are a lot Linux Distros around the world, each one has special features. So each User have to choose the OS that hast the right feature for his personal use
 

pinsipans

New member
I have no Experience with Centos, but I have never had any Problems with Ubuntu.

It is realy easy to use and comes preconfigured With Apache. (if you decided to install the OS with the LAMP Option)

Maybe give it a shot.
 

count0nz

New member
I use Unbuntu Server 14.04 Lts * not so much LTS anymore tho)

1. it works well..
2. Its Free
3. Its email to maintane / Administer...

Granted i am running in under a Hyper-V GM
But its Awsome my 2nd Choice for a Pure Server setup
Is Fedora 24.. Coppit is Awsome...
2nd is OpenSuse (You can do so much with Yast over SSH)

If your After Groupware / Email etc. theres a some Awsome out of the Box solutions also.
 

blunix

New member
Imho if you run sth like apache (and you dont have a crazy setup) it really does not matter. If centos and yum is to annoying for your usecase, switch to ubuntu.
 

Genesis

Administrator
Staff member
blunix said:
Imho if you run sth like apache (and you dont have a crazy setup) it really does not matter. If centos and yum is to annoying for your usecase, switch to ubuntu.
I tried Ubuntu once with our last VPS upgrade. I now understand why most people who host websites are using CentOS instead. CentOS has been created for Websites. Ubuntu is more of a multiple purpose OS. I'm back with CentOS.